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Yvonne Jansen

commercial property and investment

Education

Yvonne Jansen studied at Erasmus University Rotterdam, where she obtained both the master's degree in Business Law and the master's degree in Private Law. In January 2021 she graduated Cum Laude from the Grotius Specialization Course in Real Estate Law.

Lawyer at LVH

Since August 2016.

Function and facts

Yvonne works in the corporate law practice with a focus on real estate and tenancy law. Her clients include housing corporations, construction companies, landlords and tenants of business premises and start-ups.

When necessary, Yvonne litigates before courts and appeal courts on issues such as liability, rental law, unsettled claims, bank guarantees and additional work.

Sector

Construction & Property Lawyers

Expertise

Rental (contract and eviction)
Business and shareholders

Competences

Yvonne invests in contacts with clients, which enables her to move easily within organizations. She knows how to set goals and priorities effectively and goes for the best possible result. She also ensures good communication about developments and decisions in a case and gives space to ask questions.

Registration of legal areas

In accordance with Article 35b(1) of the Legal Profession Regulations Yvonne has registered the following legal areas in the register of legal areas of the Netherlands Bar: rental law, property law and business law. According to the standards of the Netherlands Bar the registration obliges her to obtain ten training credits per year in each of the registered legal areas.

Personal characteristics

Direct, meticulous and involved.

Memberships / extracurricular activities
  • member of the Association of Young Real Estate Lawyers (VJOJ).

Yvonne Jansen

commercial property and investment

+31 (0)10 209 27 75
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Yvonne Jansen
Hans Rijntjes

conflicts

+31 (0)10 209 27 55 rijntjes@lvh-advocaten.nl
Bouwe Bos

conflicts

+31 (0)10 209 27 63 bos@lvh-advocaten.nl
Ben van Nieuwaal

business and government

+31 (0)10 209 27 75 vannieuwaal@lvh-advocaten.nl
Daniël van Genderen

business and government

+31(0)10 209 27 75 vangenderen@lvh-advocaten.nl

More lawyers >
Temporary lease of business space: what is possible?

In real estate, there are two types of leases for business premises: lease of medium-sized business premises (think of a store or catering establishment) or the lease for other business premises (such as office space). This article explains the options for entering into a short-term lease for the different types of commercial space.

How does a purchase/contracting agreement work in real estate?

What is a purchase/contractor agreement? When parties agree that one of them will provide a piece of land and construct or finish a building on it for a fee, there is a contract for the purchase of the land on the one hand and a contract for work on the other hand with regard to the building. The part relating to the purchase of the land is governed by the legal rules of sale. On the part that relates to contracting work (building and delivery), the rules of contracting work apply. Therefore, it does not make much difference in practice whether one speaks of two linked contracts (purchase and contracting) or of one compound contract to which the rules for purchase and the rules for contracting apply in part.

What are the rights, obligations and liabilities of contractors and principals in contracting work?

A construction assignment to a contractor is considered a contract for work. This is an agreement whereby the contractor, on the instructions of the client - outside of employment - realizes and delivers a work of material nature. The legal relationship between the client and the contractor is - unless otherwise agreed - governed by the statutory rules for contracting work. This concise legal regulation can be found in the first section of title 7.12 of the Dutch Civil Code (art. 7:750 ff. of the Civil Code). This article explains the rights, obligations and liabilities of the parties to contracting work on the basis of the statutory regulations.

What are the rights, obligations and liabilities of clients and consultants in the commission agreement in a construction process?

At the start of a construction project, a client will often engage an architect, engineer or consultant to help him with the design (hereafter: 'consultant'). The legal relationship between the client and his consultant is - if nothing else has been agreed - governed by the legal rules for the commission contract. These legal rules can be found in the first section of title 7.7 of the Dutch Civil Code (art. 7:400 ff. of the Civil Code). The summary statutory regulation has a general and open character and is largely of a regulatory nature. It is therefore common for parties to make further agreements. Usually this is done by means of general conditions modeled by professional organizations of architects in addition to and in order to elaborate the legal regulation of the commission contract. The most recent set of general conditions in consultancy law is De Nieuwe Regeling 2011 (hereafter: 'DNR 2011'). The rights, obligations and liabilities of the parties to a commission contract are explained below, both on the basis of the legal regulations and on the basis of the DNR 2011.

Medium-sized business premises or other business premises: what is the difference and how do you determine which is which?

There are two different rental regimes for commercial property: rental for medium-sized business premises, such as stores and catering establishments (7:290 business premises) and other business premises (7:230a business premises). The applicable rental regime is indicated by the section of the Dutch Civil Code that applies to that rental regime. Rent for medium-sized business premises is regulated in Section 7:290 of the Dutch Civil Code and is therefore also referred to as 7:290 business premises. Section 7:230a of the Dutch Civil Code regulates the rent for other business accommodation, the so-called 7:230a business accommodation. This article explains the difference between medium-sized business premises and other business premises and how to determine what type of business premises is involved in your case.

More articles >
Bouwe Bos

conflicts

+31 (0)10 209 27 63 bos@lvh-advocaten.nl
Madelon van Breemen

international

+31 (0)10 209 27 65 vanbreemen@lvh-advocaten.nl
Daniël van Genderen

business and government

+31(0)10 209 27 75 vangenderen@lvh-advocaten.nl
Peter de Graaf

companies in financial struggle

+31 (0)10 209 27 52 degraaf@lvh-advocaten.nl
Yvonne Jansen

commercial property and investment

+31 (0)10 209 27 75 jansen@lvh-advocaten.nl
David Harreman

enterprise and government

+31 (0)10 209 27 77 harreman@lvh-advocaten.nl
Lisa Kloot

employees

+31(0)10 209 27 61 kloot@lvh-advocaten.nl
Ben van Nieuwaal

business and government

+31 (0)10 209 27 75 vannieuwaal@lvh-advocaten.nl
Michelle Reevers

aviation, enterprise and business 

+31 (0)10 209 27 75 reevers@lvh-advocaten.nl
Hans Rijntjes

conflicts

+31 (0)10 209 27 55 rijntjes@lvh-advocaten.nl
Rob Steenhoek

companies in financial struggle

+31 (0)10 209 27 52 steenhoek@lvh-advocaten.nl
Peter Verheijden

enterprise and business, employees

+31 (0)10 209 27 55 verheijden@lvh-advocaten.nl
Justin de Vries

companies in financial struggle

+31 (0)10 209 27 52 devries@lvh-advocaten.nl